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February 2018
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Posts Tagged ‘capacitors’

My sister’s 3 year old 40 inch LCD had the classic blinking red led non start/turn on problem. The blinking sequence is a diagnostic tool if you know how to interpret it. We called the manufacturer and they covered the repair on this particular model even though it is three years old. Copy down the full model number(including suffixes), version number if any, and the serial number and see what the manufacturer says about the coverage. In our case, they offered a one time capacitor replacement for no charge. If your tv manufacturer does not cover the repair, it is not completely hopeless. The capacitor repair should not be too expensive or difficult. If you are QUALIFIED, you can replace the caps yourself for a few dollars. Make sure you disconnect the tv, discharge the capacitors or wait a few hours for the caps to discharge before making the repair. Basically, you just unsolder the bad capacitors and solder the good ones back in. There are many videos on soldering on youtube. I guess the point of my video is, why fix it yourself when you don’t have to. This is a known issue and the manufacturer will most likely cover it. Just google bad capacitors and LCD tv and you’ll find tons of info. All televisions have high voltages and can kill you. The bad capacitors in question are on the power supply board so be extra careful TV repair is not child’s play. Treat it with respect and be cautious. For plasma TV Y board repair check out my other video on this channel. Good luck.

One works, the other doesn’t. Both have bad capacitors. Curiously, the Aopen motherboard uses Nippon Chemi-Con capacitors at every location where one is needed…everywhere except those three locations, where no-name caps are used. The Samsung LCD panel was dead to the world and only hissed when plugged in. Switchmode power supplies tend to make noises at times, particularly when they’re having trouble staying in regulation. At that point, the switching frequency may drop into the range of our hearing. Turns out it was more bad caps. Some repair shops told the previous owner that it wasn’t worth fixing. I told them it was, and that I surely could. They told me to haul it away anyway.

In this video, you’ll see one of the typical failures on LCD tvs and monitors power supply. Disclaimer: This video is informative and to show how I repaired a typical problem on a TV power supply. If you do not have any experience working with electronics get assistance from someone who does. If you don’t know what you are doing you can get injured. Music, “Leaf on the wind”, compositor “Funksaw”, from www.geeksaresexy.com, download link blogphilo.com

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